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An Unpredictable Quote About Predictability In San Diego Weather

So… here is the quote,

When people expect me to go right, I’ll go left. I’m unpredictable.
Paula Abdul

Who woulda’ thunk we would quote Paula Abdul?

Now for something predictable – San Diego weather.

The folks at SaveOnEnergy.com did a study about who has the most predictable.

Here are their results:

Cities with the Most Predictable Weather

1. Honolulu, Hawaii

By far the most populated city in Hawaii, Honolulu also has the most predictable weather. The variation in temperature is probably the most impressive factor of this Hawaiian paradise, with the average temperature 78 degrees. Sunny days are a common occurrence with the sun shining 69 percent of the time and although it precipitates 154 days a year on average, the total rainfall is 17 inches on average.

2. Oxnard, California

Oxnard is also notably predictable for temperature stability. Second to Honolulu, the temperature rarely deviates from the average of 60.8 degrees. One area where Oxnard has shown variation from the norm is wind, which on average was blowing at 6 mph but reached sustained wind speeds of 48 mph in 2011.

3. Chula Vista, California

Despite a relatively high precipitation deviation within the top 10 contenders, Chula Vista has the lowest wind variance. The deviation in precipitation is the second highest amongst the top 10, second only to San Francisco.

4. Salinas, California

Although the deviation in precipitation was relatively high, the steady numbers across temperature and wind helped keep Salinas ranking fourth. The proximity to the Monterey Bay could explain the uncertainty in rainfall.

5. San Diego, California

Only eight miles from Chula Vista, San Diego saw half as much variation in precipitation. San Diego also had a notably higher deviation of temperature from Chula Vista, which could be explained by the distance between San Diego’s weather equipment and the ocean, about 4 miles. Chula Vista’s weather data is measured at the Imperial Beach Naval landing field, only a mile to the ocean.

6. Thousand Oaks, California

Despite being more than 160 miles from San Diego, Thousand Oaks saw very similar deviations in temperature and wind. Thousand Oaks did however see substantially more variation in rainfall compared with San Diego.

7. San Francisco, California

You may be surprised to see San Francisco on the same weather related list as Hawaii and Southern California. What may not be surprising is San Francisco ranks highest within the top 10 for wind and rain deviation, but its moderate temperature variations kept San Francisco in top 10 contention.

8. Irvine, California

Coming in a close second to Honolulu for deviation in rainfall, Irvine recorded only 8.37 inches of rain for the 2016 calendar year. Alongside the other top 10 cities for predictable weather, Irvine is tied with Huntington Beach for temperature deviation at 5.52 degrees.

9. Torrance, California

This Los Angeles suburb saw slightly more wind deviation from Irvine and Huntington Beach, its close neighbors. Torrance’s location on a map might offer some explanation as it’s exposed to wind while its neighbors to the south may have protection from Santa Catalina Island.

10. Huntington Beach, California

Being only 15 miles from Irvine, you might not be surprised to see the variations in weather patterns the same for both cities. Interestingly enough however, Huntington Beach has considerably more variation in rainfall.

Another Day, Another Shark In The Water

Saturday, July 22, 2017  Another Day, Another Shark In The Water: NBC San Diego Lifeguards in Coronado issued an advisory Saturday after a shark sighting was reported at Silver Strand State Beach. The shark was described as having a dorsal fin that measured between 12 and 16 inches. The surfer who spotted the shark is a former commercial fisherman, California State Parks officials said.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 Another Day, Another 25 Sharks In The Water: KABC reports San Clemente beaches closed after 25 sharks spotted off coast.

All beaches remained closed in San Clemente Monday after more than two dozen sharks were spotted off the coast.

Up to 25 sharks were seen in the waters on Sunday within 25 yards of the beach between Cotton’s Point and Capistrano Beach, some up to 10 feet long.

Monday morning, two great white sharks were seen off the coast. Fisherman Spencer Wonder even hooked and released one of them while he was fishing off San Clemente Pier.

Sunday’s sightings were the most sharks spotted in the area so far.

This is in addition to shark attack at San Onofre.

Scientists believe there are a number of reasons behind the increase in shark sightings off our coast. These reasons may include a change in weather patterns that impact migration. Officials also want to remind beachgoers that the ocean is the sharks’ home, so people should stay away when there are sightings.

“A healthy shark population is indicative of a healthy marine ecosystem altogether. They’re the predator, they’re the apex predator, top of the line. So if they’re able to survive and sustain and grow at the rate we’re witnessing, that means it’s a very healthy bottom trophic level environment,” Wonder said.

Signs were posted along San Clemente beaches warning people to stay out of the water for now.

16+ Shark Attack Tips. Shark Research: Myths, Facts, Safety, Surfing

Shark Safety Tips: The relative risk of a shark attack is very small but should always be minimized whenever possible. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recommends the following shark safety tips about what to do and what not to do:

  • Close To Shore Part 1: CBS News recommends that you stay in groups and don’t wander too far from shore because this would isolate you and decrease your chances of being rescued.
  • Close To Shore Part 2: NOAA states that shark attacks, though rare, are most likely to occur near shore, typically inshore of a sandbar or between sandbars, where sharks can become trapped by low tide, and near steep drop offs where shark’s prey gather.
  • Sunrise / Sunset (No, not the version from Fiddler on the Roof): Don’t go in the water early in the water or in the dark/twilight hours when sharks are most active. Since sharks are nocturnal, one of the best ways to avoid sharks is to stay out of the ocean at dawn, dusk, and nighttime. Sharks move inshore during these hours to feed because most fish go through to focus in the changing light during sun up and sun down.
  • Can’t See, But Can Smell: You can’t see sharks, they can’t see you: But… while sharks also don’t have the best vision, they have a great sense of smell. So they will be more likely to confuse a human for its natural prey when visibility is low. Also note that while sharks can’t see very well, sharks detect contrasting colors.
  • Don’t Be Attractive: Don’t wear shiny jewelry in the water because it resembles fish scales in the water. Avoid bright colored clothing.
  • Don’t Be ‘Chummy’ Part 1:  If fishermen are chumming the water near you (such as a pier or jetty) try to avoid the area. Also locations such as river mouths, harbors or even sewage, can attracts bait fish, which in turn attract sharks.
  • Don’t Be ‘Chummy’ Part 2: Don’t swim where there are seals. Seals are white sharks’ preferred food, so there’s a good chance there’s also a shark in the water observing them from a distance. Even though humans aren’t on the shark’s menu, is it worth the risk?
  • Don’t Be ‘Chummy’ Part 3: Don’t go in the water if you’re bleeding.
  • Vacate… Promptly: Leave the water as efficiently, calmly, and swiftly as possible if a shark is sighted. While many sharks will not bite again, you cannot rule out a second attack.
  • Do Not Touch: Do not provoke, harass, or entice a shark, even a small one.
  • Trust Your Lifeguards: Swim or surf at beaches patrolled by lifeguards, and follow their advice.
  • Look For Signs Part 1: That includes signs on the beach that warn you.  Don’t go in the water if sharks are known to be present so heed those shark warnings.
  • Look For Signs Part 2: If fish or turtles start to behave erratically, leave the water. They may be behaving like that because there is a shark in the area.
  • Look For Signs – Bonus Tip: A fin up is a danger sign.
  • Give Up Your Catch: If you are shore fishing, kayak fishing or diving and are approached by a shark, stay as still as possible. If you are carrying fish or other catches, release the catch and quietly leave the area.
  • Don’t Be Splashy: National Geographic says, “Don’t splash too much. Refrain from excessive splashing. Keep pets, which swim erratically, out of the water. Sharks are attracted to such activity.
  • Protect Your Dog: The splash of a dog paddling is like a dinner bell for sharks. Do not take your pet with you in waters where there is even a remote chance of encountering a shark.
  • Don’t Panic (Ha!): This may seem difficult when you are attacked by a shark, but most shark attacks result in injuries that are readily survivable and clear thinking is your most powerful asset in an emergency. A wild heartbeat and erratic movements can increase a white shark’s curiosity. Take a deep breath…
  • Stop The Bleeding: If bitten, try to stop the bleeding. Control bleeding by pressing on pressure points or by applying tourniquets.
  • Seek Medical Attention: Since a sharks’ mouths have infectious microbes, treatment by a physician is always indicated even if the wounds seem relatively minor.

Bonus Shark Safety Tip: Note that sharks most often attack individuals. A friend I was surfing with told me his secret to shark safety, “Always swim or surf with someone who is ‘slower’ than you are.” No wonder he always asked me to go out for a session with him.

A little tune, just to get you in the mood…

Fighting Back A Shark Attack: If you are attacked, don’t go for the nose, the best thing to do is go for the eyes or gills. Be as aggressively defensive as you are able. ‘Playing dead’ may possibly work for bears but it does not work for sharks. Pound the shark in any way possible.

Coffee, Tea Or Me? NOAA reports that just a dozen of the more than 300 species of sharks have been involved in attacks on humans. The bigger problem is humans attacking sharks: Humans hunt sharks for their meat, internal organs, and skin in order to make products such as shark fin soup, lubricants, and leather.

Sharks evolved millions of years before humans existed and therefore humans are not part of their normal diets. Sharks are opportunistic feeders, but most sharks primarily feed on smaller fish and invertebrates. Some of the larger shark species prey on seals, sea lions, and other marine mammals.

Sharks attack humans only when they are confused or curious. If a shark sees a human splashing in the water, it may try to investigate, leading to an accidental attack. Still, sharks have more to fear from humans than we do of them.

Sharks Are Important: Sharks are a valuable part of marine ecosystems, but overfishing threatens some shark populations. NOAA Fisheries conducts research on shark habitats, migratory patterns, and population change in order to understand how to best protect and maintain a stable shark population.

What Are The Odds Of A Shark Attack? According to The International Shark Attack File (ISAF), the longest-running database on shark attacks, the chances that a shark will attack you are one in 11.5 million. To put that into context, your chances of drowning are 1 in 3.5 million.

Sometimes It Is Good Not To Be Number One: Florida leads the nation in shark attacks followed by Hawaii then California.

Shark attacks By US State
Last updated: January 23, 2017
State Total Attacks
Florida 778
Hawaii 153
California 120
South Carolina 92
North Carolina 63
Texas 42
Oregon 27
New Jersey 15
Georgia 13
New York 10
Alabama 8
Virginia 5
Delaware 4
Louisiana 4
Massachusetts 3
Mississippi 2
Washington 2
Connecticut 1
Rhode Island 1
Maine 1

Shark attacks By State: California (Last updated: January 23, 2017)

County Total Attacks
San Diego 17
Humboldt 16
Monterey 11
San Luis Obispo 11
Santa Barbara 11
Marin 10
San Mateo 9
Sonoma 8
Santa Cruz 7
Los Angeles 6
San Francisco 5
Orange 4
Del Norte 2
Ventura 1
Alameda 1
Mendocino 1

Shark attacks By State: Hawaii Last updated: January 23, 2017
County Total Attacks
Maui 63
Oahu 39
Kauai 26
Hawaii 19
Molokai 2
Open Ocean 1
Lanai 1
Johnston Island 1
French Frigate Shoals 1

More shark safety tips from the state of Hawaii.

Shark attacks By State: Florida Last updated: January 23, 2017

Last updated: January 23, 2017
County Total Attacks
Volusia 290
Brevard 134
Palm Beach 70
St. Johns 40
Duval 36
Martin 35
St. Lucie 32
Indian River 21
Monroe 16
Miami-Dade 15
Broward 14
Pinellas 12
Bay 9
Collier 8
Lee 8
Sarasota 7
Flagler 6
Escambia 6
Nassau 4
Manatee 4
Okaloosa 3
Gulf 2
Franklin 2
Walton 1
Charlotte 1
Santa Rosa 1

The state of North Carolina has had 63 shark attacks. Even the state of Washington has had two attacks and Maine has had one shark attack.

“Although the trends show shark bites are increasing in frequency, this is mostly due to more people using the oceans than ever before,” Andrew Nosal, Ph.D., a marine biologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told CBS News. “Actually, 2014 was quieter than average with only 52 unprovoked bites in the USA, with none being fatal.”

The shark safety information was compiled from the following sources:

go to the 1:11 second mark to see shark.

Update – 15 (No, Make That 25) MORE Great Whites. Another Day In The Water, Another Great White… Watch Shark In The Wave Behind Surfer

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 Another Day, Another 25 Sharks In The Water: KABC reports San Clemente beaches closed after 25 sharks spotted off coast.

All beaches remained closed in San Clemente Monday after more than two dozen sharks were spotted off the coast.

Up to 25 sharks were seen in the waters on Sunday within 25 yards of the beach between Cotton’s Point and Capistrano Beach, some up to 10 feet long.

Monday morning, two great white sharks were seen off the coast. Fisherman Spencer Wonder even hooked and released one of them while he was fishing off San Clemente Pier.

Sunday’s sightings were the most sharks spotted in the area so far.

Scientists believe there are a number of reasons behind the increase in shark sightings off our coast. These reasons may include a change in weather patterns that impact migration. Officials also want to remind beachgoers that the ocean is the sharks’ home, so people should stay away when there are sightings.

“A healthy shark population is indicative of a healthy marine ecosystem altogether. They’re the predator, they’re the apex predator, top of the line. So if they’re able to survive and sustain and grow at the rate we’re witnessing, that means it’s a very healthy bottom trophic level environment,” Wonder said.

Signs were posted along San Clemente beaches warning people to stay out of the water for now.

05/16/2017 Twelve Foot Boat, Eight Foot Sharks (What could go wrong?): Watch CBS 8 shark video of eight foot ‘juvenile’ great whites circling around a two-man 12 foot boat near Capistrano Beach.

CBS News 8 – San Diego, CA News Station – KFMB Channel 8

Shark Psychology 101 Explained?  What to do if a shark is in the water with you… Do you ask the shark(s), “How was your day? Did your parents treat you with respect? Do you feel worthy? Have you had enough to eat today?” Or, do you just get out of the water as fast as you can. Click here to learn more shark attack tips .

Share with a friend who needs to know the proper shark etiquette….

05/12/2017 Update – Just What Is Normal Shark Behavior? SAN DIEGO (CBS 8) Eric Kahnert reports from San Onofre State Beach with the explanation of, “Just what makes for an aggressive shark? What is normal and what is not?”

CBS News 8 – San Diego, CA News Station – KFMB Channel 8

05/11/2017 Update – Another Day In The Water, 15 MORE Great Whites: Fox 5 San Diego reports that beachgoers heard this broadcast from a helicopter loudspeaker as they paddleboarded in the waters off Capistrano Beach in Orange County on Wednesday “You are paddleboarding next to approximately 15 great white sharks,” is not something you want to hear when you’re enjoying a day at the beach.

The lifeguards went on to say, “We are advising that you exit the water in a calm manner. The sharks are as close as the surfline,” Orange County Sheriff Deputy Brian Stockbridge is heard saying on a video shot from a helicopter overlooking the beach.

The school of sharks was spotted by Orange County Sheriff’s Duke 1 helicopter around 1:30 p.m.

Later in the evening, another group of great white sharks was spotted more than 50 miles north of Orange County, off the coast of Long Beach. The Long Beach Fire Department issued a shark advisory, for the area warning all beach patrons to enter the beach “at their own risk.”

Another Great White Sighting David G. Woodward was surfing at Bluffs Campground in San Onofre State Park. He had a new GoPro mounted to his surfboard.

He captured his close encounter with a great white shark.

Woodward writes, “All of a sudden a great white shark appeared in the next wave. He was about 10 feet away swimming from left to right in front of me.”

Woodward added in his comment that he doesn’t believe the shark had any ill intent. “The juveniles aren’t typically a threat to us. This one seemed a bit more curious than most (which was a little disconcerting); but if he had meant me harm, he had ample opportunity. Instead, he went about his merry way.”

If you watch the video, you will notice his ‘hastened paddle style’ has been enhanced.

Click here to Watch the great white encounter with the surfer

 

Weed Coming To Del Mar. Yes, Del Mar Is Getting Marijuana!

Sure, 4/20 is a well known date/time for marijuana, but here is another – September 23, 2017. This is when the marijuana festival will be held at the Del Mar Fairgrounds

Weed By Any Other Name – If you are intimately familiar with any of these terms, “marijuana, the bionic, the bomb, the puff, the blow, the black, the herb, the sensie, the chronic, the sweet Mary Jane, ganja, split, reefa, the bad, the Buddha, the home grown, the ill, the Maui-Maui, the method, pot, lethal turbo, Thai, shake, skunk, stress, whacky, weed, glaze, the boot, dime-bag, Scooby Doo, bob, bogey, back yard boogie,” then this is for you…

Marijuana Festival at Del Mar Fairgrounds to Draw 6K

A marijuana festival, set for September at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, is estimated to draw 6,000 people to learn about cannabis through a day of exhibitions and seminars.

The Sept. 23 over-21 celebration, dubbed the Goodlife Festival, “will guide attendees to appreciate and learn more about how cannabis – when used in a safe, appreciative, legal and healthful way – can enhance a creative, spirited, relaxed (and pain-free) lifestyle,” according to a news release from organizers.

Reefer Gladness – Weed Is (Almost) Legal: Announcement of the festival comes after California voters passed a law in November to legalize recreational marijuana. The sale and taxation of recreational marijuana goes into effect Jan. 1, 2018.

What about the legal aspects of marijuana? Here is a link the California Legislative Code on marijuana.

More Weed Video – Funny: I was watching the painfully funny Ali G Show (bottom of the web page) where street-wise Ali G goes in as reporter to meet with a DEA agent about marijuana. Ali G is supposedly unsuspecting of this world and the DEA agent is painstakingly explaining to Ali G some of the phrases associated with marijuana. Ali G then asks, with his hatcheted British manner, “What is (sic) the different types of hash out there? We all know that it’s called the bionic, the bomb, the puff, the blow, the black, the herb, the sensie, the chronic, the sweet Mary Jane, ganja, split, reefa, the bad, the Buddha, the home grown, the ill, the Maui-Maui, the method, pot, lethal turbo, Thai, shake, skunk, stress, whacky, weed, glaze, the boot, dime-bag, Scooby Doo, bob, bogey, back yard boogie.” Ali G then pauses and asks, “But what is (sic) the other terms for it?”

You can watch the whole five minutes or fast-forward to 4:18 where he naively guesses all the names for marijuana.

Ali G – The various names for weed.

Or, if you prefer a softer version, Peter, Paul and Mary below.

Puff The Magic Dragon – Peter Paul And Mary

Not Like Bill…

“I’ve never broken a state law, but when I was in England
I experimented with marijuana a time or two,
and I didn’t like it. I didn’t inhale it, and never tried it again.”
Former President Bill Clinton